A while ago I, when German edition philology had become saturated by French post-structuralist ‘theory’, there was – here a there – some whispered talk about a ‘Diskursedition’ or discourse edition. Nothing concrete had been presented or published yet, but the idea had been tossed around, though in a very early stage of conception. So I decided to investigate the issue within my larger project on Editorial Pluralism – and since there were no actual examples of discourse editions or edited ‘discourse(s)’ around, I came up with a thought experiment instead: How would an endeavour like that of ‘editing a discourse’ look like? How would it have to be conceptualized, framed, justified and then: realized? What would the specific challenges be, and what (new/different) kinds of answers would it help find? More so: given the notorious vagueness of the term and of the concept ‘discourse’ (as coined by Michel Foucault and then wildly appropriated), what would serve as the object(s) of the edition? I presented my thoughts first at the international conference of the Society of Textual Scholarship and Textual Cultures (STS), ‘The Objects of Editing’ at the Loyola University in Chicago in 2013 and put them down in writing shortly after. Due to the rather unusual nature of the paper (after all, thought experiments as such are not a common genre of academic text in edition philology nor are they exercised often in literary studies) it took me a while to find a publication outlet that would sit well with both the content and the form.

The article “Editing a Discourse, Not a Text: Meta-Methodological Remarks on an Editorial Endeavour” has now been published in the Journal of Literary Theory (JLT), Vol. 10, Issue 2. Via the publishers website, both the long abstract and the bibliography are freely accessible. The full text can be downloaded via institutional subscription or individual payment, however, as usual I provide anyone with a free copy (.pdf-file) who requests one!

12. January 2016 · Comments Off on What to Expect in 2016 – a Rough Sketch · Categories: Research Dissemination · Tags: , ,

Neues Jahr, neues Glück!

My last blog post was a while ago and I haven’t been able to stick to my blogging schedule, too. However, since it’s only 12 days in the new year 2016, it’s still fine to make some resolutions. Shall we?!

#1 First of all, I want to update this blog more often, I guess, at least once a month should be reasonably doable. (Also: this post will serve as the once per month for January, unless I decide to create another, more thematic one later.) The main reason I do that for is to keep track of my various academic activities and at the same time tell my audience about what it is I do: too often I found myself taking for granted that people I meet, on-line as well as off-line, know what a humanities researcher does in her day-to-day work. They don’t. So I decided to talk about it more!

#2 Finish THE project aka the doctoral dissertation. I have invested a lot in this project and I am at the point where I want it to be finally done: and out of the way. I will use this year to present my work at a couple of specialist conferences, discuss it with my supervisors and colleagues, but mainly: finish the write-up. The database, which is a pivotal part of my dissertation, will get updated and edited, too; I hope to get all the relevant publications of 2016 in before I deliver the thesis.

#3 Finish a couple of articles that are not related to my doctoral dissertation but I agreed on doing. This will be: an article (comprised of a series of blog posts on my Georg Greflinger project blog) on the Nordischer Mercurius and the spreading of news in C17th Germany. An article on the digital scholarly edition of early modern prints (from the perspective of German edition philology). Additionally, there are three articles in submission/peer review that I hope to get published in 2016.

#4 Publish the inaugural volume of the Georg Greflinger digital edition, the Ethica Complementoria edition. It looks like the edition, incl. studies on the Ethica and its transmission and transformation will be published within a book series as well as (the edited texts) online and open access. A lot of work has gone into making this project happen that has had no and still doesn’t have any funding or institutional affiliation. I am confident that it will see the light of day in 2016. More on this project can be found on the project website blog.

#5 And last but not least: Have the 1st conference and members meeting of the association for Digital Humanities in the Nordic countries (DHN) here in Oslo in March. I am very much looking forward to see the product of our combined efforts and experience a thriving, vibrant DH community in Norway and Scandinavia!

So: stay tuned!

[a little out of the ordinary, this bloggage is in German]

Am 24. Juli war ich zum Expertengespräch und Workshop im neuen Digitalisierungs- und Editionsprojekt Narragonien digital der Universität Würzburg, welches im Rahmen des Würzburger Digitalisierungszentrums Kallimachos gefördert wird, eingeladen. Anlass war eine erste Orientierung sowie Sondierungs- und Konsultationsgespräche in Vorbereitung der Digitalisierung und editorischen Bearbeitung der für das Projekt ausgewählten Narrenschiff-Drucke. Gemeinsam mit zwei weiteren externen Kollegen (aus der Latinistik und der Romanistik) fand der Workshop im kleinen Kreis mit den Projektleitern und -mitarbeitern in informellem Austausch statt. 2009–2011 hatte ich mich bereits umfänglich mit der sog. editio princeps (Basel 1494) des Narrenschiffs von Sebastian Brant unter druckanalytisch-medienhistorischen Gesichtspunkten sowie programmatisch zu einer Neuedition im und für das digitale Medium geäussert, und es war schön zu sehen, dass in einem so groß aufgestellten Projekt wie Narragonien digital meine Überlegungen zur Wahl der Editionsgrundlage, zur Transgraphierung und zu den editorischen Beigaben Eingang finden werden (vgl. hierzu: A.R.: Sebastian Brants »Narrenschiff«Kritische Würdigung vorliegender Editionen und prinzipielle Überlegungen zu einer Neu-Edition. In: editio 25 (2011), p. 42–73).

Narragonien digital fokussiert vor allem auch die Übersetzungen, Übertragungen und Bearbeitungen des Narrenschiffs um 1500 (in verschiedene deutsche Druckersprachen, aber auch ins Lateinische, Französische, Englische), die bisher von der Forschung eher vernachlässigt worden sind und auch keine editorische Aufbereitung erfahren haben. Darüber hinaus versucht das ambitionierte Projekt, eine OCR (optical character recognition) für Frühdrucktypographie zu trainieren, die zuverlässig Drucke der in Frage kommenden Offizinen, in Antiqua- und gebrochenen Schriften, erkennen – und die Texte damit auch maschinenlesbar zugänglich machen – kann. Eine funktionierende und in ihren Resultaten zufrieden stellende OCR für gebrochene Schriften (der Frühdruckzeit) ist seit langem ein Desiderat und es bleibt zu hoffen, dass im Rahmen des Würzburger Projekts hier signifikante Fortschritte gemacht werden, von denen die community der Frühneuzeitforscher und -editoren – auch und vor allem in kleinen und Kleinstprojekten – wird profitieren können.

Meine Beschäftigung mit dem Narrenschiff war und ist zunächst druck- und buchgeschichtlich, genauer: typographiegeschichtlich. Vor diesem Hintergrund würde ich mir vor allem wünschen, dass die OCR nicht “nur” den Text möglichst fehlerfrei erkennen kann, sondern auch die jeweiligen Schriftklassen: für eine computergestützte Analyse der Typenverteilung im Narrenschiff-Erstdruck wäre dies enorm hilfreich und könnte wesentlich dazu beitragen, den Satz und die Korrekturfolgen der editio princeps für alle Bogenseiten zu rekonstruieren (mir war dies im Rahmen meiner Studie nur für die Lage E möglich). Die Buch- und Druckforschung, insbesondere die Inkunabelkunde, könnte hier in der Breite neue Erkenntnisse zur Frühdruckzeit gewinnen und gesicherte(re) Schlüsse aus dem überlieferten Material auf dessen Herstellung sowie die Verbreitung und den Handel mit Drucktypen ziehen!

Nach dem Workshop und den vielen intensiven Gesprächen plane ich, meine Arbeiten an der causa Narrenschiff-Erstdruck in naher Zukunft wieder auf zu nehmen und stelle diese gerne dem Narragonien-Projekt als Addendum der digitalen Edition sowie zur Weiterarbeit zur Verfügung.

07. August 2014 · Comments Off on Published: co-authored article in collection on typography, materiality, literature, and meaning · Categories: Research Dissemination, Textual Scholarship · Tags: , ,

Few days ago I received the print edition of long-awaited collection of articles (or: edited conference proceedings)

Text – Material – Medium. Zur Relevanz editorischer Dokumentationen für die literaturwissenschaftliche Interpretation. Ed. by Wolfgang Lukus, Rüdiger Nutt-Kofoth, Madleen Podewski. Berlin, Boston: de Gruyter 2014 (Beihefte zu editio. 37). 303 pages.

The collection contains 16 original articles in six thematic sections, and a comprehensive introduction (pp. 1–22) by the editors. (A link to the pdf-file of the table of contents can be found here).

My (co-authored) article is one of two in the opening section “Aspekte zu Theorie und Geschichte” (theory & history),

Annika Rockenberger, Per Röcken: Wie ‘bedeutet’ ein ‘material text’. In: Text – Material – Medium. Zur Relevanz editorischer Dokumentationen für die literaturwissenschaftliche Interpretation. Ed. by Wolfgang Lukus, Rüdiger Nutt-Kofoth, Madleen Podewski. Berlin, Boston: de Gruyter 2014 (Beihefte zu editio. 37), pp. 25–51.

In the article, I investigate how a material text (or: materiality in general regarding works of literature, be they printed, handwritten, engraved, painted, or even digital) means, that is: I shed some light on the notoriously vague and ambiguous term ‘meaning’ and its use, and following this clarification I tie the term to a production-oriented (communicator/sender-oriented) sign theory. Ensuing from this, I distinguish three classes of signs and show where, when, and how they are to be used when analyzing or ‘interpreting’ material aspects of (literary) texts. I exemplify, reconstruct, and critically discuss a couple of cases from (German) literary studies where material aspects have been part of or are the main focus of the interpretation of a literary text.

Once I am in the possession of a pdf-version of the printed collection, I’ll send it to anyone interested upon request! The pdf-version is accessible via the De Gruyter website (paywall) here.

The other thematic sections of the collection are: “Skriptografische Materialität: Entwurfshandschriften” (scriptographical materiality: draft manuscripts) with articles by Almuth Grésillon, Burghard Dedner, Johannes Barth, Johannes John, Gabriele Sander, and Kai Bremer. Followed by section III “Typographische Materialität I: Buch” (typographical materiality I: book) with contributions by Thomas Rahn, Gabriele Wix, and Franziska Mayer. Section IV “Typografische Materialität II: Buch vs. Zeitung/Zeitschrift” (typographical materiality II: book vs. newspaper/journal) with articles by Barbara von Reibnitz, Michael Scheffel, and Gustav Frank. The last two sections have only one contribution each: section V “Nichtschriftliche Materialität I: Audiophone Varianz” (non-scriptural materiality I: audiophone variants) with an article by Andreas Meier and section VI “Nichtschriftliche Materialität II: Die ‘Schreibszene’ jenseits des Textes” (non-scriptural materiality II: the ‘scene of writing’ beyond the text) with a witty essay by Bodo Plachta about writers’ desks, inkpots, pens, and paperweights.

You can buy the collection via de Gruyter (hardcover/e-pub) or seek out a library that has a copy. If you’re interested in my article, just send me an email and I will provide you with a pdf-version!

P.S. Due to a rather long production process of the collection (the conference was held in February 2011), I was not able to include any references to literature newer than 2012. Last changes to my article were made in October 2012!

24. June 2014 · Comments Off on Review of: Editorische Begrifflichkeit. Ed. by Gunter Martens. Berlin, Bosten 2013 · Categories: Research Dissemination, Textual Scholarship · Tags: , ,

I just published a review of the German anthology or conference proceedings:

Editorische Begrifflichkeit. Überlegungen und Materialien zu einem ‘Wörterbuch der Editionsphilologie’. Ed. by Gunter Martens. Berlin, Boston: de Gruyter 2013 (Beihefte zu editio. 36)

The review is about to appear in the latest issue of Zeitschrift für Germanistik XXIV.3 (2014), pp. 690–692.
Although I am much in favour of a German dictionary or lexicon of edition philology / textual scholarship, I was a little disappointed with the anthology: the theoretical and methodological articles as well as some of the material and sample entries were frustratingly heterogenous, unfocussed, and partly outdated. (The anthology assembles conference papers and articles from the late 1990s that were, in some cases, slightly updated and edited.) In my view, the best and most useful part of the anthology is Martin Boghardt’s systematic collection and preparation of sample entries from the fields of analytical and descriptive bibliography and print history:

Martin Boghardt: Begriffe aus der analytischen Druckforschung. In: Editorische Begrifflichkeit. Überlegungen und Materialien zu einem ‘Wörterbuch der Editionsphilologie’. Ed. by Gunter Martens. Berlin, Boston: de Gruyter 2013 (Beihefte zu editio. 36), pp. 163–192. – Access to article here (attention! paywall!)

This mini-lexicon could be the point of departure for a comprehensive new lexicon of edition philology / textual scholarship for German and Germanic studies. It should, however, NOT become another print-only, publishing company directed endeavour, but instead make use of the technologies and established and proved practices of online lexicology and be as open access and as collaborative as possible!

My review can be found here, soon. (Or you could ask me to send you a pdf!) The reviewed anthology can be accessed (attention! paywall!) here or purchased.

06. March 2014 · Comments Off on Conference Summary: On the Uses of Scholarly Editions, Feb 19–22, 2014 · Categories: Conference Report, Textual Scholarship · Tags: , ,

“Vom Nutzen der Editionen” – 15. Internationale Tagung der Arbeitsgemeinschaft für germanistische Edition. RWTH Aachen University, February 19–22, 2014

Two weeks ago I attended the 15th biennial conference of the German Association for Scholarly Editing (AG-Edition). This time, the biennial event was held at the RWTH Aachen University, Germany and hosted by the department of German and literary studies and its head of department, Thomas Bein. The topic – On the Uses of Editions – couldn’t have been more up to date. It was received broadly and transdisciplinary with almost 60 long and short paper presentations ranging roughly from the early middle ages to contemporary German literature, from musical performance practices to DADA art, from contemporary Austrian theatrical productions to early 20th century film. The focus was, at least in most of the presentations, strongly on the uses (Nutzen) of editions, while the concept of edition was quite broad, iridescing between facsimlia, historical-critical or genetic scholary editions, and multimedia archives. The conference was accompanied by committee meetings and the biennial general assembly of the association.

More »

04. March 2014 · Comments Off on Scholarly Editing, (Still) A Male Domain? · Categories: General · Tags: , ,

This time I’m at the 15th international conference of the Association for German Scholarly Editing (Arbeitsgemeinschaft für germanistische Edition, short AG-Edition) – titled “On the Uses of Editions” – held at the RWTH Aachen, Germany, and hosted by the institute for German Studies and Literary Studies and its current head of department, Thomas Bein.

I participated in the last 3 “big” conferences of the AG-Edition (2008, 2010, 2012) and one smaller one (2011) and presented at 2 big ones and gave a plenary talk at the smaller conference, and I’m acquainted with a lot of my fellow editors, textual scholars, and philologists (and musicologists). However, this time I perceived the event in a somewhat different light, perhaps (also) because of the many voices of outrage on blogs and twitter (#allmalepanel) by fellow academics bitterly pointing out the still unequal ratio of male and female persons in academia, especially in the humanities.

A quick glance at the audience and list of presenters confirmed the general observations in the field. However, I don’t want this to be just about an all subjective impression, so I will provide some numbers.

1. I analysed the updated and edited pdf-version of the printed programme & conference schedule with regard to gender of the presenters (Sektionsvorträge), the panel chairs (Moderation), the keynote speakers (Plenarvorträge), and named organiser(s). The programme is online here (pdf).

2. I also looked at the female/male-ratio in co-presentations (there were not that many since this is still uncommon in the German humanities context),

3. and I looked at – if they were talking about author editions or historical editors – at the gender of these actors.

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31. January 2014 · Comments Off on Hello Again! · Categories: General · Tags: ,

Welcome Dear Visitor!

This is my new personal weblog, after the old one has had to be ‘put down’ because of hacking trouble.

This blog is about my research projects – finished, ongoing, and planned ones alike. I will write about my doctoral dissertation project, about smaller projects, articles, and talks related to “the thesis”, about research and methodology in the humanities in general and of course about digital humaniora, that is: digital humanities in the Nordic countries (Norway, Sweden, Finland, Denmark & Iceland). However, everything concerning my co-edited digital scholarly edition of the works and writings of Georg Greflinger will be outsourced to the also new Greflinger digital edition weblog at hypotheses.org.

I have disabled the comments function throughout this blog; if you want to comment on something I wrote or get in touch about something the strikes you as interesting and worth discussing, please feel free to send me an email!

The views on this blog are my own and my own alone. They do not represent the views of the institution I am currently employed at nor do they represent the views of the (academic) associations and clubs I am a member of or am associated with.

A note on academic integrity and citation/quoting: Things “on the Internet” are subject to copyright and related rights. As for my blog entries: They are licensed under a CC BY-SA 4.0 license.

 

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